sanman

sanman

64p

171 comments posted · 34 followers · following 0

63 weeks ago @ The Space Review: essa... - The Space Review: It&r... · 0 replies · +1 points

India is not seeking to ruin space. In the contrary, India is seeking to deter certain adversaries from using ASAT weapons against India's satellite infrastructure. India carried out its test in LEO, just as the United States did some years earlier. Most of the debris will decay. Russia and China, by contrast, carried out their ASAT tests in much higher orbits, guaranteeing long-lived debris fields.

75 weeks ago @ The Space Review: essa... - The Space Review: Ther... · 0 replies · 0 points

I don't agree with the assertion that there's no race. It's like saying there can be no fight if only one side is fighting. No, there still can be, it's just that the side which isn't responding will only lose more badly.

78 weeks ago @ The Space Review: essa... - The Space Review: GSAT... · 0 replies · 0 points

Yes, we only have to look at your country China's testing of an ASAT weapon in space not to long ago, to see how destructive the effects can be. India by contrast has not tested any ASAT weapon.

82 weeks ago @ The Space Review: essa... - The Space Review: Ther... · 0 replies · +3 points

India's scheduled a Venus mission for 2023 which will include international payloads, most likely including something from NASA. http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/11/india-seek...

87 weeks ago @ The Space Review: essa... - The Space Review: A co... · 1 reply · +1 points

I once read an interview with head of Mitsubishi Heavy Industries' Space division, maker of the H-II rocket. When he was asked why Japan had not come up with its own space launch startups like SpaceX, he replied that Japan's domestic satellite launch market was not big enough to support such a startup, while the United States with its much larger launch market could. Since the space market among launching countries has largely divided up along national turf lines, then does the increasing use of satellites among non-launching countries represent enough opportunities to make a difference in the market prospects for a potential private Japanese launch company?

88 weeks ago @ The Space Review: essa... - The Space Review: Revi... · 0 replies · +2 points



I saw this movie and didn't like it. I felt that it needlessly sacrificed accuracy for the sake of a contrived narrative or messaging. Neil Armstrong was portrayed in the movie as rather aloof and emotionless. If you see actual TV interviews with the man, he didn't come across that way in real life. How unfortunate that such a well known name in the history of human progress was depicted as a cardboard cutout, rather than as a fully developed character. The movie reduced him to being a foil to other characters, who all got to sound their emotions off his impassive face. Everyone in this film had more dialogue than the title character, which says a lot.

88 weeks ago @ The Space Review: essa... - The Space Review: Revi... · 0 replies · 0 points


As a side note, I'll mention that Pakistan has announced that it will send astronauts to space with China:
https://arynews.tv/en/pakistan-decides-to-send-as...

88 weeks ago @ The Space Review: essa... - The Space Review: Disr... · 0 replies · +1 points


How about the Magnetoshell aerobraking/aerocapture technology being researched at University of Washington? Isn't that considered a potential breakthrough/disruptive technology, which could have a major impact on space missions involving atmospheric re-entry?

88 weeks ago @ The Space Review: essa... - The Space Review: Revi... · 0 replies · +1 points


In that spirit, here's a Bollywood-produced short film on India's Mars Orbiter Mission, funded by the Johnnie Walker company, maker of fine spirits:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aIAq9UEPSWU

This dramatized fictional depiction of events obviously takes a lot of creative license. The fictitious space agency featured is called ISRA, however the actors used do bear decent resemblance to real-world people involved in ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission, such as K Radhakrishan, S Kiran Kumar, Nandini Harinath (although the fellow playing Mylswamy Annadurai doesn't look like him at all.)

Perhaps as India undertakes more ambitious and higher profile space missions, and as space grows in the public consciousness, then India's film industries will naturally put out more space-related storyplots.

96 weeks ago @ The Space Review: essa... - The Space Review: Indi... · 0 replies · +1 points

Hi, you may wish to check out the following:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-anaOqFwxqU http://www.bellatrixaerospace.com/
http://agnikul.in/

Here's a partial list of various space-related companies in India:
https://yourstory.com/2018/01/india-space-startup...

Some are receiving mentorship from ISRO:
https://inc42.com/buzz/isro-to-support-space-star...