pjhall

pjhall

41p

68 comments posted · 7 followers · following 0

2 days ago @ http://www.conservativ... - Philip Booth: The plan... · 0 replies · +1 points

It is voluntary. Some people may prefer to own and live in a small flat rather than living with mum and dad or renting.

2 days ago @ http://www.conservativ... - Philip Booth: The plan... · 4 replies · +1 points

I agree that we should have multigenerational homes.Everything is a trade off. We could also have smaller multi-generational homes. One important issue is that many people do not have homes of their own - they are renters or living with parents well into adulthood. The key to solving that problem is to reduce the price of buying a home and one way to do that is to reduce the size of home. Giving people the opportunity to own property gives them a stake in society and a foot on the property ladder.

2 days ago @ http://www.conservativ... - Philip Booth: The plan... · 6 replies · +1 points

One very simple solution to the housing crisis is to remove restrictions on dwelling size. The current minimum is about 37 square metres for a one person one bedroom home. In a co-living situation this could be as little as 6 square metres or with internal bathroom and kitchen 16 square metres.

3 days ago @ http://www.conservativ... - Lord Ashcroft: An open... · 0 replies · +1 points

What is that supposed to mean?

3 days ago @ http://www.conservativ... - Lord Ashcroft: An open... · 2 replies · +1 points

The world is in the middle of an environmental catastrophe with rapid global warming and climate change, habitat destruction and plummeting wildlife populations and biodiversity. Until very recently, according to DEFRA statistics, the United Kingdom spent no more than 0.4% of its foreign aid on the existential threat of biodiversity loss. This is the result of DFID's culture of seeing everything through Clare Short's perspective of helping humans. Fair enough but without a healthy environment humans cannot exist.

A £220m biodiversity fund has just been announced and this is a step in the right direction. But it is not nearly enough in a world where only 3% of terrestrial mammals by biomass are wild while 97% are part of the human economy. So lets keep spending money on international aid but lets shift a significant part of that spend towards protecting nature.

2 weeks ago @ http://www.conservativ... - Neil O'Brien: Five way... · 1 reply · +1 points

Agree with you on HS2. As a lifelong environmentalist I believe we need to move to a zero carbon economy that prices in the environmental damage and global warming. The best way to do that is to impose a carbon tax that changes behaviour. No more importing strawberries from mexico by air or flying down to Ibiza for a weekend. And carbon taxes and tax on aviation fuels would raise substantial revenues that could 1. fund a move to a zero carbon economy 2. fund environmental remediation 3. repay national debt. Maybe the world needs to suffer more environmental damage as Australia has done in order to muster the political will to do so.

2 weeks ago @ http://www.conservativ... - Neil O'Brien: Five way... · 3 replies · +1 points

The only way to unwind the property bubble is to normalise interest rates - i.e. push the risk free rate back above 3%. Unfortunately the United Kingdom is carrying such an immense level of sovereign debt that it can't afford to allow interest rates to normalise. So we are stuck - until the government starts repaying the National Debt.

2 weeks ago @ http://www.conservativ... - Neil O'Brien: Five way... · 5 replies · +1 points

Smaller dwellings allow more people on to the property ladder. My generation had a free education, a career and affordable housing. Young people today are saddled with huge debts, work in the gig economy and can’t afford housing. We need to change it or it will be changed by others. And over 300,000 people are homeless. This is a way of providing them with permanent shelter at a cost of about £200m a year.

2 weeks ago @ http://www.conservativ... - Neil O'Brien: Five way... · 7 replies · +1 points

The current minimum size is too big - for single people and young couples at least. Lets allow smaller, cheaper dwellings and let the market decide. I would much rather have a smaller dwelling closer to the centre of town. Others would prefer to pay more for more space. the key is to make it a more flexible system.

2 weeks ago @ http://www.conservativ... - Neil O'Brien: Five way... · 9 replies · +1 points

Too small. But do you think that 400 square feet is a sensible minimum? Our population has increased from 57 million to 69 million in the last 22 years and (quelle surprise) it is going to keep going up. Mostly in England and a lot in London and the south. We can cover the country in concrete or we can start being more flexible and have denser but pleasant housing.