merciantory

merciantory

100p

2,118 comments posted · 6 followers · following 0

9 hours ago @ http://www.conservativ... - Iain Dale: Help me and... · 0 replies · +1 points

True, but no reflection on the original deal. The original understanding was that, once the debt had been paid off, the asset would go into public hands and the tolls removed. That was the basis on which Trafalgar House agreed to build it and the banks to finance it, and on which the enabling bill went through parliament. Funny old world when HMT gets involved.

10 hours ago @ http://www.conservativ... - Iain Dale: Help me and... · 3 replies · +1 points

The Dartford Bridge is a better example - no significant problems at all, and paid its debt off years ahead of schedule.

12 hours ago @ http://www.conservativ... - Ben Rochelle: Why May ... · 1 reply · +1 points

I don't think you can say that without a crystal ball. For what it is worth, I think she probably will manage some sort of a deal, though how bad remains to be seen. A stronger leadership would have managed a better deal - if only by making the threat of no deal realistic - but we don't have one of those available.

12 hours ago @ http://www.conservativ... - Gyimah is not enough · 0 replies · +1 points

You get jailed for criminal offences. You get sacked, and possibly sued, for errors of commercial judgement. So far as I am aware, none of those responsible for the financial crash committed criminal offences in that context - they were merely, with hindsight, criminally incompetent.

12 hours ago @ http://www.conservativ... - Ben Rochelle: Why May ... · 3 replies · +1 points

You cant get rid of her until you have either (1) a consensus successor; or (2) a reasonable prospect that, following a leadership contest, the losing side will rally behind the winner

At the moment, we have neither. There is no prospect of the majority of Remainers, let alone the Soubry Tendency, rallying behind a pro-Brexit leader, while a hardcore Remainer leader would be a disaster both in terms of the negotiations, and subsequently electorally.

For the present, May is the least bad answer to an impossible question, but as soon as the Brexit deal is substantially agreed, she has to go.

12 hours ago @ http://www.conservativ... - Ben Rochelle: Why May ... · 0 replies · +1 points

One of her very few good decisions. There is no right answer except to decline to answer. As an analogy, no publican (with a brain) will ever tell his customers how he votes, not if he wants to keep them all.

12 hours ago @ http://www.conservativ... - Iain Dale: Help me and... · 0 replies · +1 points

Those who can, do, and those who cant, teach, and those who are learning to teach, join Momentum.

12 hours ago @ http://www.conservativ... - Iain Dale: Help me and... · 1 reply · +1 points

Quite right. Justice is not about retribution, but many victims, understandably, are looking for precisely that. We got rid of the idea that victims should have a key role in sentencing in about, the C12th, I guess. The Saudis still haven't, and that is one of the reasons their justice system is so arbitrary.

We are now increasingly giving victims an inappropriate role in the administration of justice (victim statements, compulsory face-to-faces etc,), and through our politicians setting often arbitrary and disproportionate minimum sentencing policies to meet the latest public outrage. This trend needs to be reversed, before we end up with public trials convicting by open outcry, or some similar dystopia.

12 hours ago @ http://www.conservativ... - Iain Dale: Help me and... · 2 replies · +1 points

You have a complete obsession with Brexit. The failure of the Conservative party to make the case for capitalism and the free market pre-dates the Brexit referendum by a large margin. The problem is that we have a party many of whose senior members don't really believe in capitalism and the free market, and you are rarely going to be convincing putting a case you don't really believe in.

For many decades, the party has been split, not just over Brexit, but between the believers in the free market, and those who really believe in paternalist statism - capitalism controlled and regulated by the state (the "man from the ministry"). It is the case, though, that Brexiteers tend to believe in the free market, while the paternalists are, almost without exception, Remainers.

May is a paternalist, always has been (look at her performance as Home Secretary). When she spoke against the "nasty party" she meant the party supporting a low regulation free market economy. In common with far too many of our leading politicians, her instinctive reaction to any problem is generally to regulate it.

In summary, you mistake the symptom for the cause. The Brexit split is merely the latest manifestation of the entrenched Tory split between those who are paternalists and the free marketeers. You are of the former (I guess), while I am of the latter.

13 hours ago @ http://www.conservativ... - Iain Dale: Help me and... · 0 replies · +1 points

Hear hear