Ben Godfrey

Ben Godfrey

19p

15 comments posted · 1 followers · following 0

13 years ago @ DesertStandard - Good Morning Ocotillo!... · 1 reply · +1 points

Love it! Makes me want to ride my bike so bad.

Did you mount the camera on the top or the seat tube? The shot is actually really stable.

There's a short film in the Bike Film Fest this year that does the same thing around London. Which reminds me, if you fancy a trip to LA, the BFF is showing August 26 - 30.

13 years ago @ http://electromute.com/ - Master's Track Nationa... · 0 replies · +1 points

Good luck and here's hoping for a great long weekend of cycling. You're inspiring me to get my ass down to London's Herne Hill velodrome. One day I'll do it.

13 years ago @ DesertStandard - First day of Yoga Teac... · 0 replies · +1 points

Congrats on your first day. Good luck with the rest. Next time we get together I'll come and be one of your students.

13 years ago @ aftnn.org: home of aft... - aftnn.org: afternoon's... · 1 reply · +1 points

You're re-inventing every component of the framework. Taking the architecture from Rails means that is more tried and trusted, but the implementation is still new. Your blog states that building Turbinado is hard work, that doesn't reassure me that using it will be a productive process. Experimental stuff is incredibly important, but with this post I was complaining about the total lack of prospects for building production apps in Haskell. To build a production app, I need to use trusted components. That's a bootstrap process, but the size of the leap of faith is proportional the number of lines of code I need to import.

That said, I really think Turbinado is an important project and I wish you every success with it. A bit of Darwinian selection will be a positive for everybody.

13 years ago @ aftnn.org: home of aft... - aftnn.org: afternoon's... · 0 replies · +1 points

I completely agree. Network.UrlDisp looks quite interesting and I'd be interested to have a play with it in a FastCGI context.

Haskell feels intuitively like it should be able to express input validators simply and concisely. Formlets looks interesting, but again syntactically somewhat scary! I guess I'm just too used to reading Python.

13 years ago @ aftnn.org: home of aft... - aftnn.org: afternoon's... · 1 reply · +1 points

5,000 lines of Haskell is a big wheel.

I ignored the idea that HAppS *had* to reinvent the wheel because I simply don't think it's true. I support this argument by pointing to the way Django, Rails and a whole bunch of other frameworks slot very nicely into the LAMP stack. Each of layers in that stack can be switched for your preference MySQL to Apache SimpleDB, Linux to Solaris. This gives the developer freedom and security. HVAC put it's data into SQLite, if HVAC sucks, I can serve data from that exact same DB with PHP, Python, Ruby, Perl, Java, C/C++, Scala, Groovy, Clojure, monkeys, pigeons... I can even run several at the same time.

The unix philosophy: do one thing well.

13 years ago @ aftnn.org: home of aft... - aftnn.org: afternoon's... · 3 replies · +1 points

I think the Gnip schema looks good for what it does. I haven't really played around with it in depth, so others will have more useful comments.

Would love to see JSON though :-).

13 years ago @ aftnn.org: home of aft... - aftnn.org: afternoon's... · 0 replies · +1 points

Thanks for your thoughts.

Disclaimer: I built Followize to work for me, so that's my judgement call.

Seeing the latest update from a random set of users would be interesting, perhaps better than the latest. There are some people who update so little, they're still hard to see even in a one-person one-vote system. Unfortunately, this isn't the ordering Twitter provide. They order on friendship create date, so I'll always see updates from the 100 most recently followed people. That's interesting, but not the reason I build Followize.

Not sure about sorting at Twitter scale, I don't think their scale is actually that big. If Amazon can do it, and Google can, Twitter should be able to sa well :-). Fair enough that it may not be a trivial undertaking.

13 years ago @ http://electromute.com/ - Recursion in PHP · 0 replies · +1 points

Alas it's all hopes and dreams so far. Nothing works with Python 3 yet so no going there. I wrote a little program in Erlang to generate project definition files, but nothing serious yet. Would love to get paid to hack Erlang. Planning to update my CV soon!

13 years ago @ http://electromute.com/ - Recursion in PHP · 1 reply · +1 points

Very nice.

Recursion is such a beautiful solution.

I just got done reading Programming Erlang. Erlang is all about tail-recursive code, pattern matching and other functional loveliness. Very cool.