TamarYasdnil

TamarYasdnil

115p

3,952 comments posted · 22 followers · following 0

1 day ago @ Mark Reads - Mark Reads 'The Scienc... · 0 replies · +3 points

I had the impression that eight was only dangerous because Bel-Shamharoth was the Sender of Eight; when it was blinded by the flash, it retreated into the depths never to return, and thus never again to send evil to anyone mentioning the number. The temple collapsed as time overtook it.

1 day ago @ Mark Reads - Mark Reads 'The Scienc... · 3 replies · +3 points

Eight shouldn't be dangerous to say on the Disc, now that Belshamharoth is gone.

1 day ago @ Mark Reads - Mark Reads 'The Scienc... · 0 replies · +7 points

Pratchett may have invented it, but he may have based it on "noddle - to shake the head, as old or infirm people are liable to do" - The Dialect of Craven in the West-Riding of the County of York, by William Carr (1828). I can imagine Rincewind shaking his head a lot at the antics of the wizards.

3 days ago @ Mark Reads - Mark Reads 'The Scienc... · 2 replies · +6 points

A sequence that was going around in the 1960s:

Mathematics is the queen of the sciences. Physics is noisy and expensive math. Chemistry is smelly physics. Biology is squishy chemistry.

5 days ago @ Mark Reads - Mark Reads 'The Scienc... · 1 reply · +5 points

Now trying to remember those Geocities sites that were lost without notice...

5 days ago @ Mark Reads - Mark Reads 'The Scienc... · 1 reply · +10 points

The Luggage does your laundry if it's in the mood. Otherwise you might open it and find the shark it ate last year.
Also, the UU housekeeping department expects to do your laundry. Do you really want to upset their routine? They might barge in and start searching for your laundry if you don't give it to them immediately, and that could lead to damage of valuable friendly rocks and things like the Roundworld.

5 days ago @ Mark Reads - Mark Reads 'The Scienc... · 1 reply · +1 points

I don't know whether anyone still makes them, but back in the 1970s there were some wonderful metal bookshelves sold by Sears - "Sears Best", with baked-on enamel color and decorative plastic strips to insert into the uprights. They were assembled with bolts. The shelves had some shaping-fold lines that added strength. We made shelf-ends by bolting on heavy sheet aluminum, which also added rigidity. I still have them, and they have been overloaded with books the whole 40+years without a trace of bending.
On the other hand, many of my books are still in the moving boxes. My trusty printouts of which books are in which box (and the other printout of where each box is kept) help me find the ones I want. Boxes would be even more convenient if they were on shelves so I didn't have to restack them.

5 days ago @ Mark Reads - Mark Reads 'The Scienc... · 0 replies · +5 points

Only 47 boxes? That's not bad at all, for a reading family. I hope you printed out the catalog. Even an incomplete list can be helpful.

5 days ago @ Mark Reads - Mark Reads 'The Scienc... · 1 reply · +7 points

It must be fun to write alternative history stories, so you can have a character punch somebody in history that you would like to punch out for real.

1 week ago @ Mark Reads - Mark Reads 'The Scienc... · 0 replies · +10 points

"...by harnessing the power of swans we could fly there in a chariot."

In 1638, the English Bishop Francis Godwin's short fiction, titled The Man in the Moone, was posthumously published. In it a fictional Spanish narrator trained a flock of a kind of wild swans to carry him by a harness of strings, and when he used them to escape some brigands, they carried him to the moon. The inhabitants of the moon wear clothing of a color never seen on earth.

reprinted in The Man in the Moone, and Other Lunar Fantasies, edited by Faith K. Pizor and T. Allan Comp., 1971.