AlexanderTheHog

AlexanderTheHog

85p

921 comments posted · 257 followers · following 0

22 hours ago @ http://www.conservativ... - Chris Ham: A tax rise ... · 1 reply · +1 points

It won't work in practice: the government could double spending on the NHS and the only headlines would be about cuts and closures. If all the cash makes actual improvements, most people would still see no difference at all, because most people are healthy most of the time and the existence of the NHS is only a reassuring presence in the background, until the odd call on it which is enough to keep us hooked.

In the meantime, with your tax rise, you will find you cannot afford the car service and have to explain to the children that they cannot have the summer holiday for which you have been saving for five years, and why mummy was crying yesterday.

22 hours ago @ http://www.conservativ... - Chris Ham: A tax rise ... · 0 replies · +1 points

Yes - sorry. I was replying to the reply-to-my-reply but must have hit the wrong button, or when the page leapt down when refreshing. I'll do it again in the right place!

1 day ago @ http://www.conservativ... - Chris Ham: A tax rise ... · 2 replies · +1 points

It won't work in practice: the government could double spending on the NHS and the only headlines would be about cuts and closures. If all the cash makes actual improvements, most people would still see no difference at all, because most people are healthy most of the time and the existence of the NHS is only a reassuring presence in the background, until the odd call on it which is enough to keep us hooked.

In the meantime, with your tax rise, you will find you cannot afford the car service and have to explain to the children that they cannot have the summer holiday for which you have been saving for five years, and why mummy was crying yesterday.

1 day ago @ http://www.conservativ... - Chris Ham: A tax rise ... · 8 replies · +1 points

No - tax rises are not a vote-winner. Opinion poll questions can be skewed by asking the right question, but when the voter finds he has to cut back on spending on his family because the taxman has taken every spare penny, then the answer is "no", possibly with expletives added.

Conservatives always boost NHS spending, but the general public don't seem to believe it. It is a thankless task. Where that extra money goes, goodness knows. We only hear of closures and budget problems - somehow new hospitals and facilities do not hit the pages of the Barsetshire Chronicle or whatever - only 'family in despair after closure announced'.

No; spending on the NHS is like mediaeval barons granting estates to the local monastery to buy their way into heaven: it makes no difference but the show of religious devotion boosts their standing. If a politician were to suggest a reformation to the system, he would be burnt at the polls.

1 day ago @ http://www.conservativ... - Why an inquiry into th... · 0 replies · +1 points

Well, not a public enquiry, not an enquiry about broad policy with windy platitudes that curses every future policy decision; no.

A private enquiry though would be welcome; one which drills down to find which individuals made which decisions, and the basis of them - one which trawls their e-mails, official and private, to see who has been lobbying, influencing, directing or spooking those individuals. Ms Rudd could find a lot of interest in that, and learn more of the floor-level workings of her Byzantine department of state. There is a lot to be uncovered. Those discomforted by the process would not be Conservatives.

1 day ago @ http://www.conservativ... - Alex Morton: Conservat... · 1 reply · +1 points

"They have to gain power first" – but what makes you think they have not? Progressivist extremists do not hold the formal levers of power, but they fill the ranks of ground-level decision-making, or intimidate those who do.

We all know of examples of people sacked and driven from their positions for differing from the 'progressivist' line. Magistrates, teachers and nurses banned; employees sacked; street preachers arrested for no crime known to the statute book. If you think the extremists are not in power, ask the organisers of a feminist conference on gender identity currently skulking secretly between venues, announced just hours in advance because each advertised venue is targeted quite effectively by extremists.

Somehow those making threats or giving false information to the police have never been prosecuted.

Whenever a quango declares that 'AD' and 'BC' are offensive; whenever a guide to judges misrepresents the evidence about fostering by gay couples; whenever a white atheist equalities officer declares that Muslims are offended by a civic Christmas celebration; whenever we accept the inevitability of the agenda – this is an exercise of power.

The extremists have already gained power. The question is how to curb it.

2 days ago @ http://www.conservativ... - WATCH: The Prime Minis... · 3 replies · +1 points

The timing of all this stinks - it happens so as to come out just before the local elections and just before the CHOGM. The decision to hit individuals of the Windrush generation, who were British citizens when they arrived, is either incomprehensible stupidity, or a calculated move to discredit the Government.

Who made the decision, and who, within government or without, gave them the instruction?

3 days ago @ http://www.conservativ... - Syria. MPs to argue ab... · 0 replies · +1 points

It is right that the Government should explain to the Commons what has been done and why, and at what expense. The destruction of chemical weapons facilities accords with international interests, but Parliament has a right to be assured that there was good intelligence to the effect that the targets were such facilities, not just a dodgy dossier, and that the attacks effectively disabled them, and no more.

Had the strike been a general intervention in the Syrian Civil War against one side, that would be a very serious matter - it would strike at international law, and is something Parliament and public opinion, and common sense, have spoken against. Again, if it was just hurling high explosives around to "send a message", that would be a serious breach of international norms. (Sending a message is something best done by diplomatic letter, not by killing people.)

Taking and directing military action is not a dry, bureaucratic matter - it is to exercise powers of life and death. Parliament has no standing to direct executive action, but it is paying the bills and keeping ministers in office, and will want assurance that ministers used such an awesome authority with propriety.

3 days ago @ http://www.conservativ... - The Conservatives are ... · 0 replies · +1 points

A good many, but on occasion we manage to get elected.

3 days ago @ http://www.conservativ... - Joe Porter: We must pr... · 1 reply · +1 points

The Commonwealth has been and can be a force for the greatest good in the world, but it is facing a crisis as to its identity and purpose such that it could start to disintegrate. It must be held together in the spirit of voluntary co-operation by which it continues.

The Commonwealth barely survived the 1980s over differing approaches to South Africa, and members have left over pressure put upon them by distant white countries. The very last thing those big, white countries should be doing is to cause disaffection. Trying to press on conservative countries the latest western fads could cause irreparable harm to the real work of the Commonwealth.