51EveshamRd

51EveshamRd

88p

1,068 comments posted · 6 followers · following 0

3 days ago @ http://www.conservativ... - Sam Hall: Conservative... · 2 replies · +1 points

I'm not an environmentalist, but I really think your key stats here are wrong. See this about the carbon cycle:
https://skepticalscience.com/human-co2-smaller-th...

And this about rising human emissions increasing:
https://ourworldindata.org/co2-and-other-greenhou...

3 days ago @ http://www.conservativ... - Sam Hall: Conservative... · 0 replies · +1 points

I agree you won't convince Extinction Rebellion members, but there is a wider population out there who want to see something done on the environment, even if they are not very sure what should be done and what they'd be willing to sacrifice. Rubbishing ER is fine as far as it goes, but there needs to be some more positive message as well.

3 days ago @ http://www.conservativ... - The Brexit negotiation... · 0 replies · +1 points

You may be right, but the point about not being able to negotiate something that satisfies everyone, or perhaps even most, is a good argument, if you are the EU, for saying that we might as well end this here and now, so won't agree another extension. In that scenario, the whole calculus changes, as parliament either accepts the deal on the table or we revert to no deal.

3 days ago @ http://www.conservativ... - Ten hurdles that Johns... · 1 reply · +1 points

Sorry, but your point on prorogation is just ridiculous. Boris could not prorogue parliament for 5 weeks during the conference season, about a week longer than the usual recess at that time. Jezza prorogues parliament for two months when it would usually sit, when he has no majority and when the law basically says that a general election needs to be held. You are joking?

3 days ago @ http://www.conservativ... - Ten hurdles that Johns... · 2 replies · +1 points

Paul's article presupposes that the EU might also offer an extension as an alternative. If they and Boris had any sense, whatever is agreed between them would be presented as - and this time really would be - a final, take-it-or-leave-it deal: if it's not agreed by parliament by 31 October, we leave with no deal. Labour, LDs etc then abstain in parliamentary vote and Boris's deal is agreed. His problem comes if the deal is so limp that it is more or less the old Withdrawal Agreement, as that would cause serious issues with the ERG and DUP and also make the Brexit Party a real threat at an ensuing general election. But if he can get something that is clearly better than the WA, I think there would be a real 'Boris bounce' for the man who concluded Brexit against the odds and the BP would be largely side-lined.

3 days ago @ http://www.conservativ... - The Brexit negotiation... · 2 replies · +1 points

I'm now more confident of a deal. But the element that is missing from Paul's account is that the deal with the EU will include the provision that if it is not agreed by the UK Parliament before 31 October, the UK leaves with no deal. That would suit the EU, especially the French. It would also definitely suit Boris, as it would force his opponents either to back his deal or face no deal. What would Labour, the LDs etc do then? He'd have shot the fox of an extension. The Spartans and DUP might vote against, but I suspect they'd be in a small minority. As long as the deal is not a complete sell out - a whitewashed Withdrawal Agreement - I can see Boris being in a very strong position if there is a general election in the coming weeks. He'd be the man who delivered a credible form of Brexit, against the odds and against an undemocratic parliament. Nigel Farage would moan, but I suspect plenty of people would be so fed up of the whole Brexit issue that the BP would be more or less irrelevant.

3 days ago @ http://www.conservativ... - The Brexit negotiation... · 0 replies · +1 points

I'm now more confident of a deal. But the element that is missing from Paul's account is that the deal with the EU will include the provision that if it is not agreed by the UK Parliament before 31 October, the UK leaves with no deal. That would suit the EU, especially the French. It would also definitely suit Boris, as it would force his opponents either to back his deal or face no deal. What would Labour, the LDs etc do then? He'd have shot the fox of an extension. The Spartans and DUP might vote against, but I suspect they'd be in a small minority. As long as the deal is not a complete sell out - a whitewashed Withdrawal Agreement - I can see Boris being in a very strong position if there is a general election in the coming weeks. He'd be the man who delivered a credible form of Brexit, against the odds and against an undemocratic parliament. Nigel Farage would moan, but I suspect plenty of people would be so fed up of the whole Brexit issue that the BP would be more or less irrelevant.

Please tell me if I'm missing something?

6 days ago @ http://www.conservativ... - A modest proposal. Let... · 1 reply · +1 points

FTPA has made matters a lot worse. The old system actually worked well when there were minority governments - although the sample in modern times is very small - because a general election was relatively easy to trigger. It arguably worked less well where there was a clear government majority, as the party in power could manipulate the electoral cycle to its own advantage. The current mess is much worse, though, as nobody has real control at a very important time in the country's history.

6 days ago @ http://www.conservativ... - A modest proposal. Let... · 0 replies · +1 points

Maybe Paul could write another article about the abuse of language. The most obvious example is the second referendum idea. Is it just my impression, but 'people's vote' now seems to be going a bit out of fashion, perhaps because it too obviously raises the question: didn't the people vote already in June 2016? The new term seems to be 'confirmatory referendum', used by people who have no intention whatsoever of confirming that we will leave the EU, but who would be campaigning night and day for the first vote to be overturned, should they ever get a chance.

6 days ago @ http://www.conservativ... - A modest proposal. Let... · 5 replies · +1 points

But up until very recently, it was very easy for either parliament or the executive to bring about a general election. Now parliament effectively has a veto and is making it impossible to negotiate or to call a general election.